Category Archives: Uncategorized

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A Lightning Fast Introduction to Digital Self Defense

Category:Higher Education,Information Security,Infosec Communicator,Uncategorized Tags : 

Each year at the Rochester Institute of Technology we introduce the concepts of Digital Self Defense to incoming students. We’ve tried a variety of presentation types and venues, ranging from several sets of co-presenters talking with “smaller” groups of students to one presenter in front of the 2000+ students at our Gordon Field House.

We kicked off our activities this year at New Student Move-in Day with our table of resource materials and a guest appearance by Phishy. Phishy provides a visual reminder for students to watch out for phishing attempts. Quite a few students posed with Phishy for photos.

Our New Student Orientation activities will conclude on Saturday, Sept 1, as we deliver a series of Lightning Talks on the subject of Digital Self Defense. We’ll cover online reputation management, safer social networking, avoiding online identity theft, security requirements at RIT, and illegal file sharing.

Because we’ll have captionists and ASL (American Sign Language)  interpreters, we’ve added 3 seconds to each slide. As in other Lightning Talks, the slides will advance automatically, every 18 seconds. I’m the only one of the presenters who’s done a Lightning Talk, and I’m looking forward to seeing how each presenter deals with the challenge of a very large (~2500) audience and a slide deck they don’t control.

Five presenters. Five different styles. Huge audience. Should be interesting.

Watch for my followup post!

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Congratulations! Congratulations!! Congratulations!!! You are a Winner in the Microsoft Promotion!!

Category:Information Security,Infosec Communicator,Internet Safety,Risk,Uncategorized Tags : 

Screenshot of email Winner notification

                                                          

I received the email above today. Should I provide the information requested so I can start the process to claim my £500,000.00 GBR prize? Did anyone else receive this? Maybe I’m one of the lucky ten!


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Bulletproofing Your Career Online—Ben Woelk & Hannah Morgan

Category:Infosec Communicator,Uncategorized

Jamie Gillenwater’s review of @careersherpa’s and @benwoelk’s presentation at #stc12 in May.


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Bridge Building: Establishing Communications Processes

Category:Communications Processes,Infosec Communicator,Leadchange,Lessons Learned,techcomm,Uncategorized Tags : 

image

This past fall we had the privilege of visiting Pont du Gard, a Roman bridge and aqueduct in Languedoc in the south of France. Although built primarily without mortar (except for the top course of blocks), Pont du Gard has endured for more than 2000 years, despite frequent spring floods.

The Pont du Gard aqueduct/bridge was built to provide clean water for the town of Nimes. Its builders understood the importance of building a structure that took into account the factors that would affect the bridge. They understood at least some of the pressures that would bear on that structure. They built the bridge accordingly. Its builders designed it to endure.

Geographical map of the aqueduct of the Pont d...

Geographical map of the aqueduct of the Pont du Gard. Map created using data from OpenStreetMap. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

So, this blog is about communications. What does the Pont du Gard have to do with communications?

Much of my role as a technical communicator has been to build processes that enable the flow of good communication. I’ve had to factor in the context (pressures that will bear on the structure) in which I was building those processes. Those communications processes are the bridges (aqueducts) that I build. In distributed organizations, well built communications bridges are critical to the health of the organizations.

Over the next few weeks, I’m going to talk about bridge building.  First, I’ll discuss my initial attempts at architecting communications processes for a Fortune 500 organization that had outsourced key support processes in the midst of a major software/hardware infrastructure transformation. Next, I’ll discuss communications processes I’ve built in my role as an information security practitioner in higher education. Finally, I’ll talk about my current work to build a sustainable communications bridge that enables clear communications between a central organization and its distributed communities, ensures the concerns of those distributed communities are heard, and facilitates best practice sharing among those communities.

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Twitter Use at #STC12 Summit

Category:EDUCAUSE,Infosec Communicator,Social Networking,STC,Summit,techcomm,Uncategorized

For the two year anniversary of this blog, we’ll review Twitter use at the STC Summit conference. Twitter use among attendees continues to grow dramatically. Although this post only looks at tweets during the dates of the Summit (May 19-24), use of the #stc12 hashtag began months before the conference and continues today.

Methodology

Unlike previous years where I put a great deal of manual effort into compiling the tweets by pulling from my #stc10 and #stc11 RSS feed, this year I’ve relied on the suggestions and work of colleagues Kevin Cuddihy of STC and Karen Mardahl. Thanks also to Rick Sapir for his suggestion to use twdocs.com to collect the tweets.

Graphical Portrayals of #STC12 Information

Kevin Cuddihy published a Wordle of the most commonly used tweets at the conference in his Summit Blog post. Here’s the Wordle he compiled:

As Kevin has noted, you can see that a good amount of the Wordle is composed of usernames.

Karen Mardahl (@kmdk) uses The Archivist to compile an analysis of the tweets. The two graphics and lists below are taken from her archive.

Top Twelve Twitter Handles (% Total Tweets)

  1. 10.68% by arnoldburian (Arnold Burian)
  2. 7.45% AndreaJWenger (Andrea Wenger)
  3. 6.12% dccd (David Caruso)
  4. 5.67% rjhoughton (Rachel Houghton)
  5. 5.54% seanb_us (Sean Bean)
  6. 5.19% viqui_dill (Viqui Dill)
  7. 4.39% ninjawritermama (Sarah Baca)
  8. 4.08% phylisebanner (Phylise Banner)
  9. 4.03% ricksapir (Rick Sapir)
  10. 3.99% benwoelk (Ben Woelk)
  11. 3.95% Paul_UserAid (Paul Mueller)
  12. 3.90% MKGee (MaryKay Greuneberg)

Selected Key Words (occurrences)

  1. STC12
  2. Techcomm
  3. Content
  4. Summit
  5. @AMP;
  6. Thanks
  7. STC
  8. Session
  9. Chicago
  10. STCorg
  11. Need
  12. It’s

Observations

This year saw a number of new people “leading the way” with tweets. (Some of the usual suspects were quite busy behind the scenes, contributing to their drop in tweets. Of course, it’s also possible they were doing F2F networking!)

The week previous to #STC12, I attended the EDUCAUSE Security Professionals Conference (#sec12). The tweets at #stc12 far outnumbered those at #sec12. In my experience, security professionals are reticent about using social media. That may have been a factor in the difference.

If any of you are interested in doing a more thorough analysis of Twitter use at #stc12, let me know and I’ll send you Kevin’s document containing more than 500 pages and 87K words!

Let’s hear from you!

Did you tweet during Summit? How long have you been tweeting? What do you tweet about? Do you tweet more during conferences?

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